4 Good Pocket Knife Brands Not to Let Fly Under the Radar

We all know Gerber, Case, Great Eastern Cutlery, and ESEE. These are some of the greats in the knife industry that have held it down for ages.

But there are other good pocket knife brands in this industry that are every ounce as deserving of your respect and commendation as these high fliers.

Let’s take a look at some of them.

Schrade
Schrade is by no means a new player in the knife industry and has been around in some form or other since 1860. However, in recent times, when Schrade offloaded operations to China, it got a bit of a bad rap from knife die-hards.

But times are changing once again. Schrade is bringing some of its operations back to our shores and has in the past few years started releasing knives in the Alpha-class, which are made with exceptional quality steels and materials, and which feature proprietary new technology such as Schrade’s “pivot lock,” which is a facsimile of Benchmade’s infamous AXIS.

These are highlights not to be missed; but worry not, Schrade still makes EDC knives in the $20 range that offer unreal value for the price.

CJRB
No, CJRB is not a ripoff of CRKT, despite the hokey-sounding name; and yes, many of their knives are made in China.

That being said, many of CJRB’s knives are cult favorites, and the company works hand-in-hand with knifemaking elites like Savannah Swaggerty and Joe Flowers to produce some visionary emblems that have kept the brand popular.

Models like the Maileah, Feldspar, Ria, and the upcoming Pyrite have kept things interesting and promise to continue to do so.

Plus, they use excellent quality steels in the production of many of their knives, such as AR-RPM9 and D2.

OKC
Alright, so maybe Ontario Knife Company (OKC) is not a good pick for this list because it has a long and illustrious history of making high-quality knives.

And maybe their catalog is a little more limited than the other selections here. But there’s a reason we’re including it, and it’s just two words: RAT II.

That folding knife (the smaller cousin of the RAT I) has been universally lauded as one of the best-value folders in the entire industry.

Excellent ergonomics, a four-way pocket clip, a sturdy liner lock, AUS-8 steel, dual-washer actions, and tough-as-nails nylon scales make the RAT II a steal at anywhere from $20 and $40 (and a D2 version is available!)

Rough Ryder
Take one look at a Rough Ryder and you’ll think you’re looking at a Case knife. The difference is a Case will run you somewhere between $100 and $200 (more for some models) whereas a Rough Ryder will set you back on average, say, $12.

And, the best part is Rough Ryder actually tells you what steels they use, with several featuring blade steels of D2, VG-10, and T10 alloys. Pair this with the fact that RR uses real horn, antler, and bone scales at 10% of the price of a Case, and we have a winner.

Yes, they are made in China – but their pocket knives exhibit truly unbelievable quality at a low price, and fit and finish are generally on par with knives that cost literally ten times as much.

Where Can You Find These Good Pocket Knife Brands? (And, Like, Literally 100 More)
Not only does White Mountain Knives carry Schrade, OKC, RR, and CJRB, but they also carry something like 100 other brands, including but not limited to Cold Steel, Buck Knives, Kershaw Knives, CRKT, ESEE, Benchmade, Spyderco, Opinel, Gerber, Case, and Leatherman.

If you need something a little more robust than a Swiss Army Knife with a bottle opener, they carry it, and 100 other things besides in their collection of fixed and folding knives and multi-tools.

Need a new EDC knife? Visit their website today to learn more about these and other good pocket knife brands; they have one of the industry’s widest selections and offer rock-bottom prices, and free shipping in the U.S.

For More Information about Benchmade Pocket Knife and Cold Steel Tanto Knife Please Visit: White Mountain Knives.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

WC Captcha eighty one ÷ = eighty one